News

17 March 2015

Strengthing the future of Welsh language journalism

17 March 2015
The importance of skilled and trained Welsh language journalists needed to support a healthy and effective Welsh media industry was the topic of discussion at a panel event at Cardiff University earlier this month.

Menna Richards, formerly Managing Director of ITV1 Wales and also Director of BBC Cymru Wales until 2011, chaired a panel discussion of Welsh journalists and editors to address the shortage of trained Welsh Language journalists and communicators.

The event marked the launch of Cardiff University's new Joint Honours Welsh and Journalism degree which will mean for the first time that students will have the opportunity to study both subjects through the medium of Welsh.

The new degree, which has been designed in response to the high demand for journalists with Welsh language and journalistic skills, will combine academic rigour and analysis with opportunities for work experience and practical extra-curricular activities.

The degree will be delivered by Cardiff University's School of Welsh and School of Journalism, Media and Cultural Studies and is supported by the Coleg Cymraeg Cenedlaethol.

Menna Richards said, "There will be a warm welcome for this new Welsh and Journalism degree amongst students and employers. There is a significant demand for Welsh speaking graduates with journalistic skills.

"The School of Welsh at Cardiff University have historically led across several disciplines while the School of Journalism, Media and Cultural Studies has a strong reputation across Britain. The collaboration of these schools along with the Coleg Cymraeg Cenedlathol is a guarantee this will be a degree of the highest standard."

Professor Sioned Davies, Head of the School of Welsh, said: "For the first time, Cardiff University students have the opportunity to study Welsh and Journalism with this new and unique course. With the growth and diversification of the media and journalism fields, the call for Welsh speaking graduates who have excellent language skills and journalistic experience has increased.

"It was therefore a natural development that the School of Welsh joined with colleagues in the School of Journalism, Media and Cultural Studies to offer this new course. We thank Menna Richards for agreeing to speak about her experiences and help launch the course with this event. We also thank the panel for their contribution and for lending their voices to the important debate about the future of Welsh language journalism."

Strengthing the future of Welsh language journalism