Gwennant Mai Evans

Bangor University: Psychology

Gwennant Mai Evans

Bangor University: Psychology

The translation of words across languages usually leads to meanings that do not overlap. For example, the English word 'black' represents colour and humour, but its Japanese equivalent 'kuroi' represents colour and a mischievous mindset. As a result of socialisation and experience, it is likely that the conceptual information belonging to the first language is extensive, and the connections between this information and the lexicon are strong and automatic. Usually, these processes are much weaker in the second language because it is learnt in unnatural environments. This means that only the basic conceptual information is learnt in the second language (e.g. colour in the above example). This theory is proven in a series of experiments designed to research the strength of conceptual connections using the electroencephalogram method (EEG). The first experiment will look at conceptual mapping within both languages of Welsh-English bilingual individuals. The second experiment will go further by looking at the relationship between the context and the presentation language, and its influence on these processes. The third experiment will look at the coactivation of conceptual mapping across both languages. The results of these experiments will begin to highlight the conceptual differences which exist between the first and second languages of the bilingual individual.

Start Date: October 2016