Mathematics

Mathematics

Mathematics is a very broad subject; it is a language in itself, and is used in a wide range of scientific fields, e.g. Physics and Engineering.

In studying mathematics, you can specialise in aspects of the subject, such as Statistics, Applied Mathematics, Pure Mathematics or operational research, or you can study any combinations of these. With a view to further enhancing your learning experience, some universities offer opportunities to work in industry, or abroad, for a year.

The first two years of MMath and BSc courses are usually the same, and there will be an opportunity to transfer from one scheme to another if you wish.

It is true to say that Maths graduates are likely to receive the highest salaries, second only to Medicine and Dentistry graduates. There is an increasing demand for Mathematics graduates, and the importance of STEM skills (Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics) is recognised in the Welsh Government science agenda, Science for Wales.

A degree in Mathematics can prepare you for a brilliant career, and Maths graduates can be found working in various fields, whether as researchers, engineers, programmers, accountants or teachers. Even if you choose to work in another area after graduating, your skills in analysing, problem solving and critical thinking, along with your practical, computer and communications skills, will be an asset to you in whatever career you choose.

Elements of Mathematics degree courses are taught through the medium of Welsh in more than one university. The ability to discuss and work in both languages is vital in communicating in Wales, and studying elements of a Mathematics degree course through the medium of Welsh will give you a golden opportunity to develop the necessary language skills.

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“Mathematics is a broad subject that opens so many doors to the world of work. It’s an interesting topic because it has so many aspects. I would like the course to lead to a career in accounting.”

David Griffith, Mathematics